When you fly, do you want the pilot to have standard dashboard instrumentation, or state of the art?
— mentor, on the importance of SPC

Knowing that no decision-making is guaranteed to produce the results you want, how do you avoid either a knee-jerk reaction or decision paralysis?

Management is essentially about making accurate predictions based on available data.  Will a change made today seem wise in the future?  In the absence of a "crystal ball" we have to fall back on "statistical process control", or "SPC".  

As with the improvement sciences, SPC is not commonly taught in American academia.  This is unfortunate because the use of SPC during improvement is "best practices".  

SPC is what every other thriving industry uses to make sure they can:

  • call out negative trends BEFORE they degrade into significant issues
  • find & SUPPORT the causes of POSITIVE data movement
  • find & SUPPRESS the causes of NEGATIVE data movement
  • see if a change leads to improvement
  • know when to react and when NOT to react

We offer expert SPC and other customized data services:

  • integrating SPC to get the most knowledge out of your data
  • dashboard review, refinement, creation and ongoing maintenance
  • training and support on any brand of SPC software
  • clinical data mining to uncover areas of opportunity
  • "best-practices" charting techniques used to drive improvement
  • survey creation, collection and analysis
  • inexpensive data collection and analysis software solutions
  • summarizing large data sets from state associations and 3rd party vendors
  • creating complex custom reports
  • custom mobile apps [i.e. to collect and submit custom measures]

The use of SPC tools in improvement is as critical as a hammer is to a carpenter.

The five major SPC tools.  Each brings rich opportunities to uncover knowledge critical for improvement to occur.

The five major SPC tools.  Each brings rich opportunities to uncover knowledge critical for improvement to occur.


Collecting improvement data is just as important as taking vital signs—it all contributes to better care for the patient and that is the goal of our work. There is really no end to the improvement we can do, and our leadership expects us to make it a priority.
— team leader